cooking


Summer vacation is long over, at least it feels like it when the temperature is getting chilly in the morning and the rain is pouring down. This means it’s soon time for Civil War again, and I’m back in the kitchen as head cook.

The theme for the food this year is (swedish) 16th century and especially the records from bishop Hans Brask. My earlier exploits into medieval cooking has been centered around the 14th and 15th century so I have a lot to read!

I finally got a hold of the Medieval Household! It's one of the books from the MoL series.

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Last Sunday we cooked some of the recipies for this years feast at Civil War.

Last Sunday we cooked some of the recipes for this years feast at Civil War.

I just wanted to take a moment and promote the excellent webshop “The Spice Shop“.  It’s a spice shop in London that carries several of the more unusual medieval spices like grains of paradise, cubebs and long pepper, which are not easy (if possible at all) to buy here in Sweden. You can pay online with your credit card and I got my package 4 days after I placed my order! Now that’s what I call service!

Now I’m even more inspired to research new recipies! Forme of Cury – here I come! 😉

Last  evening went really well, unfortunately Elsa and Padraig had to leave early due to an unhappy Otto (their son). Never the less – this is what happened:

  • got home late from work and last minute shopping at 5 pm
  • the plan was that everyone should be arriving at 5.30 – *panic*
  • everyone was a bit late, thankfully, so I got to sit down for a while and relax
  • I talk a bit about the feast menu at Civil War and the recipe for the meat pie
  • the cooking commence – our kitchen is to small (especially with children running around our feet) hopefully the renovations for the new kitchen will be finished soon
  • the pies are done around 8-ish and we can all sit down and eat – the pies were delicious!
  • the guest leave around 9, left in the house are me, hubby and a kitchen disaster
  • after much needed cleaning in the kitchen we can finally go to bed  – what a day!

Sound like a lot of whining – well, even though it was a lot to do on my part, I’ll definitely hold more cooking workshops (perhaps not 1½ weeks before Civil War though…). It was a lot of fun – and hopefully everyone learnt something about medieval cooking!

Tonight most of the members (hopefully) from my shire will meet at our house for a workshop about medieval cooking.
This meeting serves two purposes. The first is that it will be an opportunity to tell everyone about the plans I have for the food at Civil War. The shiremembers will mostly either be in the kitchen with me cooking or serving the feast on Saturday evening. We’ve always had the intention of making sure that everyone knows the menu before the event. It helps in the kitchen and it makes serving a little less stressful. When have never managed to take time to present the menu previos years so this is definately a time to treasure!
The second purpose is the have an intresting shire meeting where we actually do something productive instead of just socialising (which is nice but doesn’t attract new members). Cooking is a subject that has really interested me lately so it will be great to discuss cooking with another member who I rarely get to see and who’s also interested (and a good lot better) in cooking.

EDIT: The workshop went well, 9 people showed up at our house and I think everyone had a good time. And we did eat a good meatpie!

I’m the head cook at this years Civil War (again) and I’ve started to test and prep for the lunch and feast. Lunch, serving approx 160 people, will this year be compost with grilled chicken and cameline sauce. We’ve been going safe these last years and served a well and truly tested meatstew but both Dis and I felt that it was time to do something a bit more researched.

Compost, grilled chicken and cameline sauce

Compost, grilled chicken and cameline sauce

So, the other night I did a test run on the lunch which consisted of compost (pickled sallad), a grilled chicken and cameline sauce. The compost was very good, fresh and a great stomach filler. The chicken was very simple with a red wine and honey glaze. I was the most suprised with the cameline sauce. It had a very strong taste and really made a difference with the chicken.
Note to self: A couple of tablespoons is enough for one person.

I’ve used recepies from Medieval Cookery, but I’ve tweaked them a bit depending on how I have interpreted the original text. I’m planning on writing down a more extensive documentation, but that will have to wait a while. Just better make sure I don’t loose all the little notes I’ve made! 🙂

/Cristina